Posing nude with your child subject to child sexual abuse – EGGP to Akuapim Poloo

Exla Group tells gender ministry and the police

Entertainment of Wednesday, 1 July 2020

Source: Class FM

Ghanaian actress, Akuapem Poloo

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ExLA Group Gender Programme (EGGP), an agency under the ExLA Group has said it is “undignifying” to purposefully and intentionally circulate naked pictures taken as a mother and that of a seven-year-old boy on social media.

According to the group, the action violates the Criminal Offences Act, 1960.

The EGGP has also called on the Department of Children and the Ghana Police Service to respectfully deal with the matter under the relevant laws.

Actress Rosemond Brown, known in showbiz circles as Akuapim Poloo, on Tuesday, 30 June 2020, posted a nude photograph of herself kneeling before her son who was also wearing an underwear, to mark his 7th birthday celebration.

Akuapim Poloo wrote: “Son today reminds me of the very day I gave birth to you with no stress and with no regret…30th June 2013 exactly 4:46 am Sunday Haha I still remember this date paa because it’s really meant a lot to me, I only felt the 30 minutes pain when you were turning to come out you were soo good to me. I gave birth with no complication, no cut no disability Haha I love you son. You see how you looking at me always remember that I love you. I’m naked in front of you because this is how naked I was giving birth to you, so in case you find me naked lying somewhere don’t pass by me but rather see me as your mom who brought you to life.”

The photograph has since gone viral on social media.

A statement signed by Executive Director of the ExLA Group, Daniel Osei Tuffuor, noted that even though it acknowledges such celebrations, the EGGP is “unable to turn a blind eye to the statutory violations attendant with such indecent and immoral conduct.

“The children’s Act 1998, Act 560 stipulates in Section 2(1) as follows ‘The best interest of the child shall be paramount in a matter concerning the child”. It further brings to light that, the best interest of the child shall always be the primary consideration by the court, person, an institution or any other body in a matter concerned with the child. This text is evident in section 2(2) of the Act. The mother, being a PERSON is expected to conduct herself when dealing with her child in a manner that inures to the general welfare of her baby.’”

The statement continued that: “By posting almost a naked picture of the child does not lend itself to the best interest of the child. A mother who is naked, with her private part shown to a boy of seven years is a sheer affront to the development of the child. The boy is in his formative years which are a period of cognitive (intellectual), social, emotional and physical development of the child and so such indecent exposures would go a long way to affect the child’s character formation which would later have a toll on society. Research has shown that many rapists formed their habits as a result of sexual abuse and exploitations by their relatives including mothers when they were young and that the posturing of Ms. Rosemond Brown subjects the child to sexual abuse and same must not be countenanced by right thinking members of society.”

Also, “another side of it is that when this boy grows up and finds out about the indecent exposure his mother has meted out to him, it would take years to undo the psychological trauma emanating from this act.”

The EGGP also emphasised on “a further provision in the act by section 6(2) which invokes parental duty and responsibility. The law places on parents some responsibilities and duties towards their children” and pointed out that the conduct of the actress “falls short of the specific dictate of the Children’s Act and in altruism, an apology of her parental duty of care to the child. Section 6(2) specifically states that “A child has the right to life, dignity, respect, leisure, liberty, health, education and shelter from parents”.”

The EGGP further continued that: “It is undignifying, and a lack of respect to take naked picture as a mother and that of a 7-year-old boy, and purposefully and intentionally circulate on social media. The Criminal and Other Offences Act, 1960, Act 29 has also been violated by Ms. Rosemond Brown by intentionally circulating her nude pictures on her social media pages bearing in mind her large following. The law on obscenity is clear. Section 281 sheds light on publication of obscene material. It states that “A person commits a misdemeanor who (a) for the purposes of or by way of trade or for the PURPOSE OF DISTRIBUTION, or public exhibition, makes, produces, or has in his possession one or more obscene writings, drawings, prints, paintings, printed materials, pictures, posters, emblems, PHOTOGRAPHY, cinematography films, or ANY OTHER OBSCENE OBJECT. “

According to the EGGP, from the statutory law, “Ms Brown’s act of posting her naked picture on social media is a Public Exhibition. This intentional act implicates this section of the statutory law and therefore it is a criminal offence.”

The EGPP, therefore, called on the “Department of Children under the Ministry of Gender, Children and Social Protection as well as the Ghana Police Service to respectfully deal with this matter under the relevant laws to serve as a deterrent to other parents whose conduct are statutorily barred but yet disregard same and flout the law” and also called on “the Social Welfare Department to look at the matter.”

It added that: “It is about time ‘celebrities’ take their respectful roles to front public morality and sanity at all times.”

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